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Lee Adler - A Mad Man Amid the Machines

Museum hours apply , January 23, 2020 - March 29, 2020 | Ulrich Museum of Art-Wichita State University

Based largely on the Ulrich's uniquely rich holdings of works by Lee Adler (1926-2003), this exhibition will reassess the legacy of a forgotten artist and show how the imagery he created in the 1960s and 1970s foreshadowed urgent present-day concerns about the way human lives have become intertwined with the technology that surrounds them.

A native of Brooklyn in its industrial heyday, Adler came to art-making in his forties, having already established a successful career in marketing - he worked for a time at one of the advertising firms featured on the TV show Mad Men. He threw himself head first into his new pursuit throughout the late 1960s and 1970s. Adler contributed as his answer a visual remarkably tied to the forms of living things. At once whimsical and unnerving, Adler's compositions evoke processes of ingestion, digestion, and explusion of matter as it moves through both living and mechanical systems. In Adler's work, the machines are humanized while human figures become machines, and his forms continue to capture something essential today about our reality as hapless cyborgs confused about where "nature" ends and technological culture begins.

  • Admission:

    Free

  • Times:

    Museum hours apply

Lee Adler - A Mad Man Amid the Machines <p>Based largely on the Ulrich's uniquely rich holdings of works by Lee Adler (1926-2003), this exhibition will reassess the legacy of a forgotten artist and show how the imagery he created in the 1960s and 1970s foreshadowed urgent present-day concerns about the way human lives have become intertwined with the technology that surrounds them.</p> <p>A native of Brooklyn in its industrial heyday, Adler came to art-making in his forties, having already established a successful career in marketing - he worked for a time at one of the advertising firms featured on the TV show <span>Mad Men</span>. He threw himself head first into his new pursuit throughout the late 1960s and 1970s. Adler contributed as his answer a visual remarkably tied to the forms of living things. At once whimsical and unnerving, Adler's compositions evoke processes of ingestion, digestion, and explusion of matter as it moves through both living and mechanical systems. In Adler's work, the machines are humanized while human figures become machines, and his forms continue to capture something essential today about our reality as hapless cyborgs confused about where "nature" ends and technological culture begins.</p> 1845 N. Fairmount Wichita, KS America/Chicago
  • Ulrich Museum of Art-Wichita State University
  • 1845 N. Fairmount
  • Wichita, KS 67260
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